Is the Saucony Mirage for real?

Today’s run (street): 3.1 miles

My experience with running in a more minimal shoe has been good and I credit the Saucony Kinvaras for that. When I started wearing these shoes I had concerns that a less constructed neutral running shoe would cause me some problems. Before the Kinvaras I had been running in the Brooks Adrenalins as a daily trainer and I didn’t expect that to change. As it happened, the Kinvaras caused no issues with their lack of stability features and as a low arch pronator I’m questioning the need for stability control. The need for guidance support may come with runs longer than mine that top out at around 11 miles.

I’m still keenly interested in minimal running shoes so I asked the folks at Saucony whether I could review the new Hattori, a super light, zero drop minimal racer/trainer. There are a limited supply of these shoes for testing so Saucony graciously offered a pair of the new Mirages, the fraternal twin to the Kinvara. The Mirage has some stability features and a little more structured upper. If the fit of the Mirage is close to the Kinvara I will wear the Mirages during my half marathon. It might be a perfect combination for the 13.1 mile distance. I’ll document my experience and review it on Runner’s Tech Review.

Men’s ProGrid Mirage

Quick summary of the Mirage (per Saucony):

  • The perfect light trainer for a slight overpronator
  • Lightweight with great responsiveness
  • Allows the foot to move through the gait cycle unrestricted

Upper:

  • Hydrator collar lining
  • Memory Foam Heel Pods
  • EVA Sockliner
  • HRC Strobel Board

Midsole:

  • Heel ProGrid LITE
  • High Abrasion EVA (EVA+)
  • Supportive Arc

Outsole:

  • Blown rubber
  • XT-900™

Weights:
Men: 8.9 oz
Women: 7.9 oz

I’m not going to comment too much about my run this morning except to say that it was difficult and my performance was terrible. A friend on the running blogsphere (and a person who ran the Dirty Sock 10K in about half the time as me) commented that blood donation can have a real effect on performance for two weeks after the donation. I’ll accept that at face value and not dwell on today’s workout. I’m hoping for significant improvement tomorrow but I’ll settle for a mediocre run.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s